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Description

Pulmonology is a medical specialty that deals with diseases involving the respiratory tract. The term is derived from the Latin word pulmō, pulmōnis (“lung”) and the Greek suffix -λογία, -logia (“study of”). Pulmonology is synonymous with pneumology (from Greek πνεύμων (“lung”) and -λογία), respirology and respiratory medicine. Pulmonology is known as chest medicine and respiratory medicine in some countries and areas. Pulmonology is considered a branch of internal medicine and is related to intensive care medicine. Pulmonology often involves managing patients who need life support and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonologists are specially trained in diseases and conditions of the chest, particularly pneumonia, asthma, tuberculosis, emphysema, and complicated chest infections.

 

In the United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa[dubious – discuss], and Australia the term “respiratory physician” is used (rather than pulmonologist) to distinguish a physician that practices pulmonology. In Canada, respirology and respirologist are used [1]. Surgery of the respiratory tract is generally performed by specialists in cardiothoracic surgery (or thoracic surgery), though minor procedures may be performed by pulmonologists. As mentioned above, pulmonology is closely related to critical care medicine when dealing with patients who require mechanical ventilation. As a result, many pulmonologists are certified to practice critical care medicine in addition to pulmonary medicine. There are fellowship programs that allow physicians to become board certified in pulmonary and critical care medicine simultaneously. Interventional pulmonology is a relatively new field within pulmonary medicine that deals with the use of procedures such as bronchoscopy and pleuroscopy to treat several pulmonary diseases. Interventional pulmonology is increasingly recognized as a specific medical specialty.

The pulmonologist begins the diagnostic process with a general review focusing on:

  • hereditary diseases affecting the lungs (cystic fibrosis, alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency)
  • exposure to toxins (tobacco smoke, asbestos, exhaust fumes, coal mining fumes)
  • exposure to infectious agents (certain types of birds, malt processing)
  • an autoimmune diathesis that might predispose to certain conditions (pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension)

Physical diagnostics are as important as in the other fields of medicine.

  • Inspection of the hands for signs of cyanosis or clubbing, chest wall, and respiratory rate.
  • Palpation of the cervical lymph nodes, trachea and chest wall movement.
  • Percussion of the lung fields for dullness or hyper-resonance.
  • Auscultation (with a stethoscope) of the lung fields for diminished or unusual breath sounds.
  • Rales or rhonchi heard over lung fields with a stethoscope.

As many heart diseases can give pulmonary signs, a thorough cardiac investigation is usually included.

Scope of Research

Our Scope of Research Areas

Bronchitis Emphysema
Asthma Pulmonary Oedema
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Carcinoma
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Pathophysiology of Copd
Cystic Fibrosis Respiratory Care
Lung Injury Pulmonary Function Test
Pulmonary Tuberculosis Thoracic Surgery
Pulmonary Hypertension Pulmonary Embolism

 

Note: If your research work does not match the scope of the journal please forward us your research area. The same will be forwarded to our Editorial Board and upon approval, we can add it to our scope and add the same to our list.

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