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Description

Radiology is the science that uses medical imaging to diagnose and sometimes also treat diseases within the body. A variety of imaging techniques such as X-ray radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicine including positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used to diagnose and/or treat diseases. Interventional radiology is the performance of (usually minimally invasive) medical procedures with the guidance of imaging technologies.

 

The acquisition of medical images is usually carried out by the radiographer, often known as a Radiologic Technologist. The Diagnostic Radiologist, a specially trained doctor, then interprets or “reads” the images and produces a report of their findings and impression or diagnosis. In some places, a Reporting Radiographer, a radiographer with additional training, will take on the role of diagnostic reporting. In some countries, a radiographer will attach a brief comment that is then transmitted to the Clinician who requested the imaging. The comment known as a “radiographer comment” or “preliminary image evaluation” provides a rapid preliminary response to a clinical question, which is followed later by a final, radiologist lead diagnostic report. Medical images are stored digitally in the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) where they can be viewed by all members of the healthcare team within the same health system and compared later on with future imaging exams. Radiographs (originally called roentgen graphs, named after the discoverer of X-rays, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen) are produced by transmitting X-rays through a patient. The X-rays are projected through the body onto a detector; an image is formed based on which rays pass through (and are detected) versus those that are absorbed or scattered in the patient (and thus are not detected). Rontgen discovered X-rays on November 8, 1895 and received the first Nobel Prize in Physics for their discovery in 1901.

 

In film-screen radiography, an X-ray tube generates a beam of X-rays, which is aimed at the patient. The X-rays that pass through the patient are filtered through a device called an grid or X-ray filter, to reduce scatter, and strike an undeveloped film, which is held tightly to a screen of light-emitting phosphors in a light-tight cassette. The film is then developed chemically and an image appears on the film. Film-screen radiography is being replaced by phosphor plate radiography but more recently by digital radiography (DR) and the EOS imaging. In the two latest systems, the X-rays strike sensors that converts the signals generated into digital information, which is transmitted and converted into an image displayed on a computer screen. In digital radiography the sensors shape a plate, but in the EOS system, which is a slot-scanning system, a linear sensor vertically scans the patient. Plain radiography was the only imaging modality available during the first 50 years of radiology. Due to its availability, speed, and lower costs compared to other modalities, radiography is often the first-line test of choice in radiologic diagnosis. Also despite the large amount of data in CT scans, MR scans and other digital-based imaging, there are many disease entities in which the classic diagnosis is obtained by plain radiographs. Examples include various types of arthritis and pneumonia, bone tumors (especially benign bone tumors), fractures, congenital skeletal anomalies, etc.

Scope of Research

Radiology is the science that uses medical imaging to diagnose and sometimes also treat diseases within the body. A variety of imaging techniques such as X-ray radiography, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicine including positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used to diagnose and/or treat diseases.

Ultra Sound Abdomen Diagnostic Imaging
Nuclear Medicine Radio Active Isotopes
X-Ray Radiography
Positron Emission Tomography Interventional Radiology
Computed Tomography Digital Radiology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fetal Imaging
Radiation Rediatric Imaging
Musculo Skeletal Imaging Cardiopulmonary Imaging

 

Note: If your research work does not match the scope of the journal please forward us your research area. The same will be forwarded to our Editorial Board and upon approval, we can add it to our scope and add the same to our list.

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